Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread
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  1. #1
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    Icon4 Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread

    Fat is back in fashion, suggest analysts

    [FONT=courier new]By Anne Bruce, 10-Jul-2014


    [/FONT]
    30lnmah 1


    Data indicates that sales of fatty foods such as butter are rising as consumers focus on limiting sugar and increasing protein in their diet, says Euromonitor International.

    In Western Europe, volume consumption of butter
    has increased by 36,000 tonnes over 2008-2013, compared to a 26,000 tonnes increase on consumption of spreadable oils and fats, Euromonitor ingredients analyst Lauren Bandy told Foodnavigator.com

    In North America, consumption of butter increased by 19,000 tonnes whilst spreadable fats and oils saw a decline in consumption of 62,000 tonnes, she said.

    Butter up
    Butter was not only a more natural product but many consumers were not prepared
    to compromise on taste when it came to spreads, she said.

    Bandy and colleague Diana Cowland, Senior Health and Wellness Analyst
    assessed the evidence for a changing perspective on diet
    in a recent Euromonitor Nutrition podcast on “Attention Turning Away from Fat as an Ingredient”.

    They highlighted a recent study by the University of Cambridge in March 2014
    which put fat in the media spotlight. (see reference)

    The study shows that total saturated fat has no association with heart disease
    and that the current level of evidence does not clearly support guidelines restricting saturated fatty acid consumption to reduce coronary risk.

    Nor does it support high consumption of
    polyunsaturated fats – such as omega 3 or omega 6 – to reduce coronary heart disease.

    Limiting sugar
    Bandy and Cowland said that while the scientific community had heavily criticised the study, many consumers are now focusing on limiting sugar and increasing protein in their diet rather than focusing on fat consumption.

    Cowland said that fat “used to be the ingredient to blame”, with ingredient companies obsessed
    with finding fat replacers, but now attention was shifting to limiting sugar and increasing protein in the diet.

    While sugar and protein were in the limelight of the media, less innovation would likely to be taking place on reduced fat packaged food and beverages, she said. However, opportunities lay in products high in good fat that have been fortified with fat-related functional ingredients such as plant stenols or Omega fatty acids.

    It was important that manufacturers looked at products as a whole, not their individual
    macro-nutrients, particularly as those products which were low in fat were often higher in sugar
    and as regulation on labelling was set to get stricter.


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    Last edited by COACH; 07-12-2014 at 10:08 AM. Reason: ..more souce



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  2. #2
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    Re: News of science & nutrition

    Wow that's actually very interesting, and the thing about it is the fact that no one would realize this unless it was actually brought to their attention. Great read!




  3. #3
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    Re: News of science & nutrition

    I actually worry more about chemical additives and preservatives then I do a little natural fat or sugar.


    The musclemecca bodybuilding news guy


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    Icon10 Re: Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread

    [FONT=arial black]‘What do you want, blood?’ China’s CFDA bans sale of Vampire Drinks[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]By Ben Bouckley 16 *Jul* 2014

    [/FONT]
    WhatdoyouwantbloodChinasCFDAbanssaleofVa 1[FONT=arial narrow]

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]China’s Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) has banned the sale of a fruit punch in
    packaging designed to look like a medical blood bag, citing food safety concerns and dubious ethics.

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]Sold until now online and in C*stores, the drinks are seemingly inspired
    by US movies such as The Vampire Diaries and Twilight, and had names like
    Vampire Diaries Drink, Imitation Blood Plasma.

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]But on July 15 the CFDA sank its teeth into the sub*sector, insisting that many of the drinks
    do not meet food product requirements for labelling, production license
    numbers and manufacturing dates.

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]The CFDA said in a statement that using such “unqualified products” as a
    marketing tactic to snare thrill*seekers “runs counter to basic principles of sincerity and
    ethics in society, violates national laws and regulations, [and] misleads consumers”.

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]More damningly, the drinks hurt teens mental and physical health, the watchdog said, ordering
    vendors to stop selling the beverages and warning of fines in the event of non compliance.

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]The novelty drinks are clearly something of a craze in China, and The Shanghaiist
    reported earlier this month that a restaurant in Benxi, Northeast China was
    serving drinks in blood bags, with staff dressed as doctors and nurses.

    [/FONT]

    [FONT=arial narrow]Reportedly, the drinks are even served in a brick*walled room meant to resemble
    a cellar decorated with coffins and books about vampires, with vampire*themed background music.[/FONT]





  5. #5
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    Icon4 Re: Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread

    [FONT=courier new][FONT=impact]From carbs to cancer: Gut bacteria linked to colorectal cancer mechanism
    [/FONT]
    [/FONT][FONT=arial narrow]By Nathan Gray 24-Jul-2014[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]
    [/FONT]
    FromcarbstocancerGutbacterialinkedtocolo 1[FONT=arial narrow]


    [/FONT][FONT=arial narrow]A carbohydrate-rich diet may be kick-starting certain gut microbes to produce chemical
    signalls that drive abnormal cell growth and increase the risk of cancer, according
    to new research in mice.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]
    The study, published in Cell, noted that while colorectal cancer has been linked to
    carbohydrate-rich western diets, and some have suggested the microbiota may
    play a role , the underlying mechanisms behind carbohydrate-rich diets being linked to
    increased cancer rates has been unclear.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]Led by Alberto Martin from the University of Toronto, the new study may provide clues
    to such mechanisms by showing that gut microbes metabolise carbohydrates in the diet, and
    that these metabolites - such as the fatty acid butyrate - may cause intestinal cells to
    proliferate and form tumours in mice that are genetically predisposed to colorectal cancer.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]The use with antibiotics that damage the gut microbiota and a low-carbohydrate diet
    were both found to significantly reduce tumours in the mice, said Martin - who suggested
    that such 'easy interventions' provide a starting point for preventing common types
    of colorectal cancer in humans.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]"Because hereditary colorectal cancer is associated with aggressive and rapid tumour
    development, it is critical to understand how major environmental factors such as microbes
    and diet interact with genetic factors topotentially affect disease progression," said Martin.

    "Our study provides novel insights into this question by showing
    that gut bacteria interact with a carbohydrate-rich diet to stimulate a
    prevalent type of hereditary colon cancer."

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]'Western diet', carbs and DNA repair Carbohydrates account for about half of the daily
    caloric intake of adults in many western-style diets. This is type
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]of dietary pattern has been linked to colorectal cancer in humans by previous studies.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]Colorectal cancer is also frequently associated with mutations in a tumour suppressor
    gene called APC as well as the MSH2 gene - which plays a critical role in repairing
    DNA damage, said the team.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]They noted that it until now, it had been unclear why mutations affecting these DNA repair
    pathways are much more common in colorectal cancer compared with other cancers.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]However, the findings from Martin and his colleagues suggest that gut microbes also
    contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, and could interact with diet
    to explain how the mutations could cause this type of cancer.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]"By providing a direct link between genetics and gut microbes, our findings suggest that
    a diet reduced in carbohydrates as well as alterations in the intestinal microbial community
    could be beneficial to those individuals that are genetically predisposed to
    colorectal cancer," said Martin.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]Knockout study[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]To explore this question, Martin and his collaborators used mice that had
    APC and MSH2 mutations and were therefore predisposed to develop colorectal cancer.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]They reported that mice given either antibiotics or a low-carbohydrate diet had reduced
    cell proliferation, as well as the number of tumours in the small intestines and colons.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]These groups of mice also had reduced levels of certain gut microbes - which are known to metabolise [/FONT][FONT=arial narrow]carbohydrates to produce the fatty acid butyrate.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]"By altering the microbiota composition reduces CRC in APCMin/+MSH2−/− mice, and that
    a diet reduced in carbohydrates phenocopies this effect. Gut microbes did
    not induce colorectal cancer in these mice through an inflammatory response
    or the production of DNA mutagens but rather by providing carbohydrate-derived metabolites such as butyrate that fuel hyperproliferation of MSH2−/− colon epithelial cells," the team wrote.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]In further experiments, when the researchers increased butyrate levels in the
    antibiotic-treated mice, cell proliferation and the number of tumours increased in
    the small intestines.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]Taken together, Martin and his team said their findings suggest that carbohydrate-derived
    metabolites produced by gut microbes drive abnormal cell proliferation and
    tumour development in mice genetically predisposed to colorectal cancer.

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]"Gut Microbial Metabolism Drives Transformation of Msh2-Deficient Colon Epithelial Cells"[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]Authors: Antoaneta Belcheva, Thergiory Irrazabal.[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial narrow]
    [/FONT]




  6. #6
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    Re: Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread

    Interesting read Coach!


    The musclemecca bodybuilding news guy


  7. #7
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    Re: Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread

    [FONT=courier new]Coffee really Affects Your Risk of Dying?[/FONT]



    Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread


    Updated November 13, 2014.


    In the United States and in many other countries, coffee is an extremely popular beverage.
    It is an essential part of daily living for many people, not only because they enjoy it - or may even be
    dependent on it
    but also because drinking coffee has become an integral feature of many important rituals of socialization.

    Indeed, people who refuse to drink coffee can sometimes feel left out.


    Despite coffee’s popularity (or perhaps because of it), some experts have warned for decades
    that coffee drinking is bad for your health, and in particular may be bad for your heart.

    These claims stem from evidence that caffeine can increase
    blood pressure andlipid levels.
    However, despite numerous studies aimed at detecting health risks
    associated with coffee drinking, science has generally failed to document such concerns.



    Does Coffee Impact Your Risk Of Death?

    In August, 2014 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, researchers published results of a sophisticated meta-analysis
    on the effect of coffee drinking on the risk of dying from heart disease or cancer, and its effect on overall mortality.

    The investigators were interested in determining not only whether coffee affected mortality, but also what “doses” of coffee consumption
    were associated with any observed changes in the risk of dying.


    Their analysis included 21 large studies undertaken from 1966 to 2013, which had enrolled a total of nearly a million individuals.

    Here is what the study found:


    Cardiac mortality: Compared to people who drank no coffee, people who drank one cup per day experienced an 11% reduction in cardiac mortality.
    This mortality benefit “peaked” (at about 20%) for people who drank 3 - 4 cups per day, and then began to diminish
    as the amount of coffee consumption increased beyond that level.

    Cancer mortality: Several reports over the years have suggested that coffee might reduce the risk of certain cancers.
    In this large study, however, there was no difference in cancer mortality
    between people who drank no coffee, and people who drank from 1 to 6 cups of coffee per day.



    Overall mortality: Compared to people who drank no coffee, coffee drinkers had a reduced mortality rate.
    Again, this mortality benefit seemed to peak at between 3 - 4 cups per day (at about a 15% reduction in mortality).

    So Coffee Drinking Is Good For You?

    It appears that, in large populations of people, drinking coffee may (on average) confer health benefits.
    In particular, the risk of cardiac death and of overall mortality
    appears to be lower in coffee drinkers, with the optimal benefits seen in people who drink 3 - 4 cups per day.

    Whether caffeine has anything to do with such health benefits is not entirely known.
    Coffee contains a host of active substances aside from caffeine - substances that are thought
    to act as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, for instance - that may be contributing to this beneficial effect.


    Epidemiological studies like this one, no matter how well they are performed, cannot possibly answer
    whether a specific individual will realize health benefits from coffee drinking.

    They can only tell us about the average response, across a large population.


    We know that some individuals (probably determined by their genetic makeup)
    are particularly sensitive to caffeine, and may suffer severe sleep deprivation, jitteriness, or palpitations after drinking coffee
    (or any other caffeine-containing food or medication).

    We also know that
    caffeine sensitivity can change dramatically
    at various periods in one’s life (especially during pregnancy, when sensitivity to caffeine almost always increases).

    Drinking coffee is clearly not a good idea for everyone.

    As a general rule, then, coffee drinking appears to have health benefits.
    But at least until routine genetic testing is available that might tell us about our own
    individual sensitivity to caffeine, whether coffee drinking is a good idea for us
    is something we’re just going to have to figure out for ourselves.



    Sources:

    Crippa A, Discacciati A, Larsson SC, et al.
    Coffee Consumption and Mortality From All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer:
    A Dose-Response Meta-analysis. Am J Epidemiol. 2014;180(8):763–775.


    Last edited by COACH; 11-17-2014 at 11:55 AM.


  8. #8
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    Re: Breaking News - Science & Nutrition Thread

    Closed-Duplicate Content






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