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Do antioxidants hinder your gains?

Achilles

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Ive been reading a lot about this and there seems to be 2 camps. What do you guys think of it. Do they or do they not hinder your gains
 

Big04pimpin

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I don't see how they would hinder gains? They help your body repair, but I never read anything too deep into them. You have any articles arguing about it? Kinda curious as to how they would say it would hinder growth.
 

Ironslave

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Avoid them after a workout, but otherwise, they should be a part of ALL nutrition programs.
 

Ironslave

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DOES ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION PREVENT FAVORABLE ADAPTATIONS TO EXERCISE TRAINING?

Author(s): Padilla, Jaume; Mickleborough, Timothy D.
Volume 39(10), October 2007, p 1887
Med Sci Sport. Exerc.



We read with great interest an article by Knez et al. (4) published in the February 2007 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®, measuring the oxidative stress response to endurance exercise in half and full Ironman triathletes. Interestingly, Knez et al. (4) found that those athletes taking antioxidant supplementation exhibited a greater oxidative stress response to endurance exercise than nonusers. Although the authors (4) were able to support their results by referencing previous research that suggests the prooxidant effect of antioxidant supplementation (vitamin E) in Ironman triathletes (5), we believe that Knez et al. (4) failed to consider more recently reported findings that suggest other mechanisms to explain the differential oxidative response between the antioxidant supplementing and nonsupplementing athletes.

Based on the classical physiological concept of hormesis (3), which refers to a generally favorable biological response to exposures of toxins or stressors, recurring episodes of exercise-induced oxidative stress may increase the tolerance of the organism to withstand higher doses; however, this protective long-term effect may be ablated ( Ironslave note: this mean the protective adaptation is that the body develops to fight oxidative stress doesn't happen) when exercise training is combined with antioxidant supplementation. In this context, and contrary to the general credence that oxidative stress associated with strenuous exercise causes cellular damage, the role of exercise-induced production of free radicals in cell signaling should be considered (2).

(here comes some science talk

Particularly, the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappa ([kappa])B is activated with exercise, leading to increased expression of antioxidant enzymes (1). There is sufficient evidence to suggest that reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (RONS) are crucial in generating signals that are imperative for cell adaptation to exercise training. In a recent study using rats, Gomez-Cabrera and colleagues (1) eloquently demonstrated that decreasing the exercise-induced RONS formation (via xanthine oxidase inhibition) prevented activation of important signaling pathways, predominantly the mitogen-activated protein kinase-NF[kappa]B pathway, and, as a result, antioxidant enzyme expression was reduced. When considering Gomez-Cabrera et al.'s (1) findings, it is reasonable to speculate that athletes taking antioxidant supplementation throughout an exercise training period may develop inappropriate antioxidant adaptations. Consequently, under exposure to an extreme oxidative exercise challenge such as an ultraendurance race, users of antioxidant supplementation may well display an increased oxidative stress compared with nonusers. Therefore, the findings of Gomez-Cabrera et al. (1) and Knez et al. (4) raise an important question: Does antioxidant supplementation prevent favorable adaptations to exercise training? We believe that the recommendation that physically active individuals should supplement with antioxidants needs to be revised, as exogenous antioxidants may prevent useful and protective adaptations to habitual exercise.

Jaume Padilla

Timothy D. Mickleborough

Department of Kinesiology

Indiana University

Bloomington, IN
REFERENCES

1. Gomez-Cabrera, M., B. Consuelo, F. V. Pallardo, J. Sastre, L. L. Ji, and J. Vina. Decreasing xanthine oxidase-mediated oxidative stress prevents useful cellular adaptations to exercise in rats. J.Physiol. 567:113-120, 2005. [Context Link]

2. Jackson, M. J. Free radicals in skin and muscle: damaging agents or signals for adaptation? Proc. Nutr. Soc. 58:673-676, 1999. Bibliographic Links [Context Link]

3. Ji, L. L., and M. Gomez-Cabrera. Exercise and hormesis. Activation of cellular antioxidant signaling pathway. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1067:425-435, 2006. [Context Link]

4. Knez, W. L., D. G. Jenkins, and J. S. Coombes. Oxidative stress in half and full ironman triathletes. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 39:283-288, 2007. [Context Link]

5. Nieman, D. C., D. A. Henson, S. R. McAnulty, et al. Vitamin E and immunity after the Kona Triathlon World Championship. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 36:1328-1335, 2004. Ovid Full Text Bibliographic Links [Context Link]
 

philosopher

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I'll send you a pm with the full text of this abstract. This provides some awnsers

1: J Nutr Biochem. 2007 Jun;18(6):357-71. Epub 2006 Dec 6. Links

The influence of antioxidant supplementation on markers of inflammation and the relationship to oxidative stress after exercise.


Interest in the relationship between inflammation and oxidative stress has increased dramatically in recent years, not only within the clinical setting but also in the fields of exercise biochemistry and immunology. Inflammation and oxidative stress share a common role in the etiology of a variety of chronic diseases. During exercise, inflammation and oxidative stress are linked via muscle metabolism and muscle damage. Because oxidative stress and inflammation have traditionally been associated with fatigue and impaired recovery from exercise, research has focused on nutritional strategies aimed at reducing these effects. In this review, we have evaluated the findings of studies involving antioxidant supplementation on alterations in markers of inflammation (e.g., cytokines, C-reactive protein and cortisol). This review focuses predominantly on the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated from muscle metabolism and muscle damage during exercise and on the modulatory effects of antioxidant supplements. Furthermore, we have analyzed the influence of factors such as the dose, timing, supplementation period and bioavailability of antioxidant nutrients
 

tim290280

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^^ I posted a study on antioxidants and "free radicals" a while back. Basic gist was that your body actually needs the "free radicals" in order to recover from stressors. The body doesn't actually react otherwise and this is detrimental to a lot of health aspects. Compliments IS' post nicely but at the same time we shouldn't get carried away with antioxidants like the health food and supplements companies promote.
 

Achilles

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thanks for the great info guys. So their fine as long as you seperate them from your workout
 

Big04pimpin

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^^ I posted a study on antioxidants and "free radicals" a while back. Basic gist was that your body actually needs the "free radicals" in order to recover from stressors. The body doesn't actually react otherwise and this is detrimental to a lot of health aspects. Compliments IS' post nicely but at the same time we shouldn't get carried away with antioxidants like the health food and supplements companies promote.

Thanks for summing it up. It makes sense because if all the free radicals are gone then whats going to trigger your body to heal up?
 

Ironslave

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Thanks for summing it up. It makes sense because if all the free radicals are gone then whats going to trigger your body to heal up?

Well, I'd certainly think that throughout the day, it would be of immense benefit to include antioxidant rich foods/supplements. But not after a workout.
 

Big04pimpin

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Well, I'd certainly think that throughout the day, it would be of immense benefit to include antioxidant rich foods/supplements. But not after a workout.

Ya, definitely but its like anything. Too much of it is a bad thing and I can see how your body needs it just like everything else. I have always been told how "HORRIBLE" free radicals are but its just part of the system. Its got me curious, going to have to start reading up on it.
 

Ironslave

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Ya, definitely but its like anything. Too much of it is a bad thing and I can see how your body needs it just like everything else. I have always been told how "HORRIBLE" free radicals are but its just part of the system. Its got me curious, going to have to start reading up on it.

They are horrible, lol.
 
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