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Drinking Coffee

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Caffeine (not coffee) pre workout:



Effect of caffeine ingestion on one-repetition maximum muscular strength.Astorino TA, Rohmann RL, Firth K.
Department of Kinesiology, CSU - San Marcos, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road, MH 352, San Marcos, CA, 92096-0001, USA, astorino@csusm.edu.

Multiple studies corroborate the ergogenic properties of caffeine (CAF) for endurance performance, yet fewer investigations document the efficacy of acute caffeine intake for intense, short-term exercise. The aim of the study was to determine the ergogenic potential of caffeine during testing of muscular strength and endurance. Twenty-two resistance-trained men ingested CAF (6 mg/kg) or placebo (PL) 1 h pre-exercise in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. They refrained from caffeine intake and strenuous exercise 48 and 24 h, respectively, pre-visit. Initially, resting heart rate and blood pressure were obtained followed by one-repetition maximum (1-RM) testing on the barbell bench press and leg press. Upon determination of 1-RM, participants completed repetitions to failure at 60%1-RM. Heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured after the final repetition. Compared to PL, there was no effect (P > 0.05) of caffeine on muscular strength, as 1-RM bench press (116.4 +/- 23.6 kg vs. 114.9 +/- 22.8 kg) and leg press (410.6 +/- 92.4 kg vs. 394.8 +/- 95.4 kg) were similar. Total weight lifted during the 60% 1-RM trial was 11 and 12% higher for the bench press and leg press with caffeine compared to placebo, yet did not reach significance. RPE was similar at the end of resistance exercise with CAF vs. PL. Acute caffeine intake does not significantly alter muscular strength or endurance during intense bench press or leg press exercise, yet the practical importance of the increased muscular endurance remains to be explored.



Caffeine (not coffee) Post work out:



J Appl Physiol. 2008 May 8 [Epub ahead of print]
Related Articles
Click here to read
HIGH RATES OF MUSCLE GLYCOGEN RESYNTHESIS AFTER EXHAUSTIVE EXERCISE WHEN CARBOHYDRATE IS CO-INGESTED WITH CAFFEINE.

Pedersen DJ, Lessard SJ, Coffey VG, Churchley EG, Wootton AM, Ng T, Watt MJ, Hawley JA.

Diabetes and Obesity, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

We determined the effects of the co-ingestion of caffeine with carbohydrate on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in 7 trained subjects who completed 2 experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Prior to an experiment subjects performed exhaustive cycling and consumed a low-carbohydrate diet. The following morning subjects reported to the lab and rode until volitional fatigue. Upon completion of this ride subjects consumed either carbohydrate (CHO; 4 g.kg BM(-1)) or carbohydrate plus caffeine (CAFF, 8 mg.kg BM(-1)) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle and blood samples were taken throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion and increased by a similar amount after 1 h of recovery. After 4 h of recovery CAFF resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 +/- 69 vs. 234 +/- 50 mmol+/-kg- d.w, P<0.001). The overall rate of resynthesis for the 4 h recovery period was 66% higher in CAFF compared to CHO (57.7 +/- 18.5 vs. 38.0 +/- 7.7 mmol+/-kg-1 d.w.h-1, P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of CAMKThr286 was similar post-exercise and after 1 h of recovery but after 4 h CAMKThr286 phosphorylation was higher in CAFF than CHO (P<0.05). Phosphorylation of AMPKThr172 and AktSer473 was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects, the coingestion of large amounts of caffeine with carbohydrate has an additive effect on rates on post-exercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared to when carbohydrate alone is consumed.




Coffee and health:



The relationship of coffee consumption with mortality.Lopez-Garcia E, van Dam RM, Li TY, Rodriguez-Artalejo F, Hu FB.
Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachussetts, USA. esther.lopez@uam.es

BACKGROUND: Coffee consumption has been linked to various beneficial and detrimental health effects, but data on its relation with mortality are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between coffee consumption and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and all causes during 18 years of follow-up in men and 24 years of follow-up in women. DESIGN: Sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the association between coffee consumption and incidence of all-cause and disease-specific mortality in a prospective cohort study. SETTING: Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study. PARTICIPANTS: 41,736 men and 86,214 women with no history of CVD or cancer at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: Coffee consumption was assessed first in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women and then every 2 to 4 years through 2004. Investigators documented 6888 deaths (2049 due to CVD and 2491 due to cancer) among men and 11,095 deaths (2368 due to CVD and 5011 due to cancer) among women. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, smoking, and other CVD and cancer risk factors, the relative risks for all-cause mortality in men across categories of coffee consumption (<1 cup per month, 1 cup per month to 4 cups per week, 5 to 7 cups per week, 2 to 3 cups per day, 4 to 5 cups per day, and >or=6 cups per day) were 1.0, 1.07 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.16), 1.02 (CI, 0.95 to 1.11), 0.97 (CI, 0.89 to 1.05), 0.93 (CI, 0.81 to 1.07), and 0.80 (CI, 0.62 to 1.04), respectively (P for trend = 0.008). For women, the relative risks were 1.0, 0.98 (CI, 0.91 to 1.05), 0.93 (CI, 0.87 to 0.98), 0.82 (CI, 0.77 to 0.87), 0.74 (CI, 0.68 to 0.81), and 0.83 (CI, 0.73 to 0.95), respectively (P for trend < 0.001). This inverse association was mainly due to a moderately reduced risk for CVD mortality and was independent of caffeine intake. By contrast, coffee consumption was not statistically significantly associated with risk for cancer death after adjustment for potential confounders. Decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated with a small reduction in all-cause and CVD mortality. LIMITATION: Coffee consumption was estimated from self-report; thus, some measurement error is inevitable. CONCLUSION: Regular coffee consumption was not associated with an increased mortality rate in either men or women. The possibility of a modest benefit of coffee consumption on all-cause and CVD mortality needs to be further investigated.
 

Bulkboy

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with my fucked up sleeping pattern i would walk around like a zombie if i didnt have coffee or redkick during the day:p
 

Big_Guns_Lance

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Ive never tried coffee or tea for that matter in my life. ive always thought about drinking coffee though to help "wake" me up as they say.
 

Beau

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i heard recently stats say black coffee is good for a healthier longer life...i'll try to find the article
 

vdawg

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yeah if your going to drink coffee, drink it black but i find it tastes like ass so bring on the cream and sugar.
 

Achilles

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Caffeine (not coffee) pre workout:



Effect of caffeine ingestion on one-repetition maximum muscular strength.Astorino TA, Rohmann RL, Firth K.
Department of Kinesiology, CSU - San Marcos, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road, MH 352, San Marcos, CA, 92096-0001, USA, astorino@csusm.edu.

Multiple studies corroborate the ergogenic properties of caffeine (CAF) for endurance performance, yet fewer investigations document the efficacy of acute caffeine intake for intense, short-term exercise. The aim of the study was to determine the ergogenic potential of caffeine during testing of muscular strength and endurance. Twenty-two resistance-trained men ingested CAF (6 mg/kg) or placebo (PL) 1 h pre-exercise in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. They refrained from caffeine intake and strenuous exercise 48 and 24 h, respectively, pre-visit. Initially, resting heart rate and blood pressure were obtained followed by one-repetition maximum (1-RM) testing on the barbell bench press and leg press. Upon determination of 1-RM, participants completed repetitions to failure at 60%1-RM. Heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured after the final repetition. Compared to PL, there was no effect (P > 0.05) of caffeine on muscular strength, as 1-RM bench press (116.4 +/- 23.6 kg vs. 114.9 +/- 22.8 kg) and leg press (410.6 +/- 92.4 kg vs. 394.8 +/- 95.4 kg) were similar. Total weight lifted during the 60% 1-RM trial was 11 and 12% higher for the bench press and leg press with caffeine compared to placebo, yet did not reach significance. RPE was similar at the end of resistance exercise with CAF vs. PL. Acute caffeine intake does not significantly alter muscular strength or endurance during intense bench press or leg press exercise, yet the practical importance of the increased muscular endurance remains to be explored.



Caffeine (not coffee) Post work out:



J Appl Physiol. 2008 May 8 [Epub ahead of print]
Related Articles
Click here to read
HIGH RATES OF MUSCLE GLYCOGEN RESYNTHESIS AFTER EXHAUSTIVE EXERCISE WHEN CARBOHYDRATE IS CO-INGESTED WITH CAFFEINE.

Pedersen DJ, Lessard SJ, Coffey VG, Churchley EG, Wootton AM, Ng T, Watt MJ, Hawley JA.

Diabetes and Obesity, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

We determined the effects of the co-ingestion of caffeine with carbohydrate on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in 7 trained subjects who completed 2 experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Prior to an experiment subjects performed exhaustive cycling and consumed a low-carbohydrate diet. The following morning subjects reported to the lab and rode until volitional fatigue. Upon completion of this ride subjects consumed either carbohydrate (CHO; 4 g.kg BM(-1)) or carbohydrate plus caffeine (CAFF, 8 mg.kg BM(-1)) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle and blood samples were taken throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion and increased by a similar amount after 1 h of recovery. After 4 h of recovery CAFF resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 +/- 69 vs. 234 +/- 50 mmol+/-kg- d.w, P<0.001). The overall rate of resynthesis for the 4 h recovery period was 66% higher in CAFF compared to CHO (57.7 +/- 18.5 vs. 38.0 +/- 7.7 mmol+/-kg-1 d.w.h-1, P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of CAMKThr286 was similar post-exercise and after 1 h of recovery but after 4 h CAMKThr286 phosphorylation was higher in CAFF than CHO (P<0.05). Phosphorylation of AMPKThr172 and AktSer473 was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects, the coingestion of large amounts of caffeine with carbohydrate has an additive effect on rates on post-exercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared to when carbohydrate alone is consumed.




Coffee and health:



The relationship of coffee consumption with mortality.Lopez-Garcia E, van Dam RM, Li TY, Rodriguez-Artalejo F, Hu FB.
Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachussetts, USA. esther.lopez@uam.es

BACKGROUND: Coffee consumption has been linked to various beneficial and detrimental health effects, but data on its relation with mortality are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between coffee consumption and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and all causes during 18 years of follow-up in men and 24 years of follow-up in women. DESIGN: Sex-specific Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the association between coffee consumption and incidence of all-cause and disease-specific mortality in a prospective cohort study. SETTING: Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study. PARTICIPANTS: 41,736 men and 86,214 women with no history of CVD or cancer at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: Coffee consumption was assessed first in 1986 for men and in 1980 for women and then every 2 to 4 years through 2004. Investigators documented 6888 deaths (2049 due to CVD and 2491 due to cancer) among men and 11,095 deaths (2368 due to CVD and 5011 due to cancer) among women. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, smoking, and other CVD and cancer risk factors, the relative risks for all-cause mortality in men across categories of coffee consumption (<1 cup per month, 1 cup per month to 4 cups per week, 5 to 7 cups per week, 2 to 3 cups per day, 4 to 5 cups per day, and >or=6 cups per day) were 1.0, 1.07 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.16), 1.02 (CI, 0.95 to 1.11), 0.97 (CI, 0.89 to 1.05), 0.93 (CI, 0.81 to 1.07), and 0.80 (CI, 0.62 to 1.04), respectively (P for trend = 0.008). For women, the relative risks were 1.0, 0.98 (CI, 0.91 to 1.05), 0.93 (CI, 0.87 to 0.98), 0.82 (CI, 0.77 to 0.87), 0.74 (CI, 0.68 to 0.81), and 0.83 (CI, 0.73 to 0.95), respectively (P for trend < 0.001). This inverse association was mainly due to a moderately reduced risk for CVD mortality and was independent of caffeine intake. By contrast, coffee consumption was not statistically significantly associated with risk for cancer death after adjustment for potential confounders. Decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated with a small reduction in all-cause and CVD mortality. LIMITATION: Coffee consumption was estimated from self-report; thus, some measurement error is inevitable. CONCLUSION: Regular coffee consumption was not associated with an increased mortality rate in either men or women. The possibility of a modest benefit of coffee consumption on all-cause and CVD mortality needs to be further investigated.

Thanks, so it isnt all that bad :xyxthumbs:
 

warpig

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I always feel like I'm on a high when I drink coffee, its like rocket fuel...except i shit my brains out haha
 

bambam55

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I like to use black coffee when in the mornings or when on a cut. It helps to get you going and it helps to burn some extra calories. Just make sure you leave out the sugar and cream, thats how coffee makes people fat.
 

tim290280

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Caffeine (not coffee) pre workout:

Effect of caffeine ingestion on one-repetition maximum muscular strength.Astorino TA, Rohmann RL, Firth K.
Department of Kinesiology, CSU - San Marcos, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road, MH 352, San Marcos, CA, 92096-0001, USA, astorino@csusm.edu.

Caffeine (not coffee) Post work out:


J Appl Physiol. 2008 May 8 [Epub ahead of print]
Related Articles
Click here to read
HIGH RATES OF MUSCLE GLYCOGEN RESYNTHESIS AFTER EXHAUSTIVE EXERCISE WHEN CARBOHYDRATE IS CO-INGESTED WITH CAFFEINE.

Coffee and health:

The relationship of coffee consumption with mortality.Lopez-Garcia E, van Dam RM, Li TY, Rodriguez-Artalejo F, Hu FB.
Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachussetts, USA. esther.lopez@uam.es
Now post the ones about caffeine receptors in the body and how the levels required to retain homeostasis raises significantly. Post the one about caffeine withdrawl and low level addiction. :disgust:

Caffeine in moderation. :xyxthumbs:
 

The Creator

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^^ haha so true! I read a study a while back saying how consistent caffeine use has no ergogenic benifits. And Ozzy, the son of the devil himself, once said that he believes caffeine is a gateway drug to things like cocaine. Maybe thats a little far fetched but I think it should always be used in moderation.
 

Ironslave

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Eh,

Does coffee have some good phytochemicals? Absolutely. Are long term (and especially high dose) stimulants harmful? I'd argue so.

I'd recommend going with something like green/white tea, less stimulants, more health benefits.
 

vdawg

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you simply cant resist a coffee from tim hortons............... the canadians will know what im talking about
 

tim290280

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Eh,

Does coffee have some good phytochemicals? Absolutely. Are long term (and especially high dose) stimulants harmful? I'd argue so.

I'd recommend going with something like green/white tea, less stimulants, more health benefits.
Yes green tea cures AIDS as well now, must drink it :jerkoff1:

I'm a big fan of tea but the health benefits are a bit hyped. The good compounds are for the large part in trace amounts.
 

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Now post the ones about caffeine receptors in the body and how the levels required to retain homeostasis raises significantly. Post the one about caffeine withdrawl and low level addiction. :disgust:

Yes green tea cures AIDS as well now, must drink it :jerkoff1:

Wow, what did I or Ironslave do to deserve this kind of response? I'm new to this board, Ironslave is a moderator and on other boards I've seen people get banned for less. And I'm not sure what that respected label means, but what I've seen from you doesn't fit in with what I would expect from it.

So how about you posting the info you we're talking about yourself?

Anyway, you do realize that the body builds resistance to pretty much any exogenous substance over time?

In the last paper, they followed people for 24 years, results: possible health benefits. That seemed pretty long term to me. That doesn't mean that I don't agree with Ironslave that green or white tea would be better, but realize that I nowhere in this topic recommended coffee intake because it will add years to your life and is such an awsome ergogenic aid. The TS simply asked if coffee is harmfull, and I posted information that it's more likely than not beneficial.

BTW, exercise can result in low level addiction, nobody should work out?
 

tim290280

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Wow, what did I or Ironslave do to deserve this kind of response? I'm new to this board, Ironslave is a moderator and on other boards I've seen people get banned for less. And I'm not sure what that respected label means, but what I've seen from you doesn't fit in with what I would expect from it.

So how about you posting the info you we're talking about yourself?
Dry humour is clearly lost in translation here. :methman:

IS knows where I'm coming from with both my statements. You're new so I'll try and clear up the confusion. :xyxthumbs:

The reason I am not posting up those studies myself is that I either have in the past or have at least alluded to them. You however have posted only a small snapshot of the caffeine conundrum. Essentially you are picking out the convenient pieces of science to help put your argument across without even alluding to any of the other information available. This is considered lying in some parts but in this instance I know that you were just hyping the benefits. You have to put it all in context, hence my post.
Anyway, you do realize that the body builds resistance to pretty much any exogenous substance over time?
:dunnodude: I pretty much said as much in my post....
In the last paper, they followed people for 24 years, results: possible health benefits. That seemed pretty long term to me. That doesn't mean that I don't agree with Ironslave that green or white tea would be better, but realize that I nowhere in this topic recommended coffee intake because it will add years to your life and is such an awsome ergogenic aid. The TS simply asked if coffee is harmfull, and I posted information that it's more likely than not beneficial.
But you only gave him half the information. I could post that water is beneficial post a whole heap of positive studies but if you neglect to mention that you can drink too much or drown in it then you only have half the info you need.
BTW, exercise can result in low level addiction, nobody should work out?
Well in some cases yes :uhoh2: But the question is ambiguous and you would need more information.

My concern with these sorts of threads about the benefits of "X" is that a lot of the studies are misleading. The media reported conclusions don't always take into account the co-factors that were found, the press release fails to mention that you would need to consume 300x the normal serving to obtain the amount tested, etc etc etc. My shot at green/black tea (even though I pointed out I am a fan of it) was related to this. Someone posted a thread recently about how certain chemicals in green tea had been found to do a raft of great things (including help AIDS sufferers). It was a pity that the article posted didn't mention just how much of the tea you would have to consume (let alone how it would have to be prepared) to get the supposed benefits.

Selective statement of facts is not scientific and thus not really helpfull :tiphat:
 

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The reason I am not posting up those studies myself is that I either have in the past or have at least alluded to them.

Obviously I didn't want to see those papers, I just don't like it when people try to shift the burden of proof. But are you seriously trying to say that you posted studies about caffeine which said it can cause addictiong and you build sensitivity to it? Seriously? My granny knew that 70 years ago.

You however have posted only a small snapshot of the caffeine conundrum. Essentially you are picking out the convenient pieces of science to help put your argument across without even alluding to any of the other information available. This is considered lying in some parts but in this instance I know that you were just hyping the benefits. You have to put it all in context, hence my post.

Please tell me this is your dry humor again? Because I better hope your not serieusly calling me a liar. Do you really expect me to write a meta-analyse about caffeine/coffee to answer a simple question about coffee? I've read endless papers about the topic (which I'm pretty sure you didn't) and based on that I picked some which I thought are informative. I wasn't hyping, I didn't tell anyone how awsome coffee is, but if I was I could easily included much more, for example the recent paper showing increased glycogen resynthesis PWO.

You on the other hand, just made a weak statement that coffee should be in moderation, with weak arguments to back it up. You're not putting things in context, if you don't see the benefits greatly outweight the 'drawbacks'.

:dunnodude: I pretty much said as much in my post....

No, you did not. You made it sound you knew something special about caffiene. It does not make sense to mention that it does for caffeine, if you infact knew that it does for most things.

But you only gave him half the information. I could post that water is beneficial post a whole heap of positive studies but if you neglect to mention that you can drink too much or drown in it then you only have half the info you need.

Selective statement of facts is not scientific and thus not really helpfull :tiphat:

LOL. This is pretty much an insult to his intelligence, as much to mine. Everyone knows that caffeine be addicting and you build resistance to it, aswell that if you drink 20L of it you die. Not mentioning that is not only telling half, I pressume common knowledge to be commonly know.
Should I add to every post: don't forget to breath though, you'll die without it?

My concern with these sorts of threads about the benefits of "X" is that a lot of the studies are misleading.

Does it look to you that I pulled those PAPERS from the cover story of the New York Times?



Too me it just sounds like you're just trying to look smart, which based on the post I read from you (and your colomn).
Plz prove me wrong and write about the drawbacks of caffeine/coffee, but if you can't, drop the attitude.
 

bambam55

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Tim makes some very good points here that I think everyone should try to chime in on. Another thing to always look at is how reliable the source of the study actually is. We see muscle tech articles that say a "study" was done and you can gain something crazy like 10lbs of muscle in a month on creatine. We throw that out because we know they aren't a reliable source. A lot of these studies are done the same way.

In one of my biology classes our professor handed out this big study on all the health benefits of green tea. So you read it and your like ok wow great green tea is good for you. But the professor pointed out that the study was most likely just as tim said only pointing out every benefit it could find because the source of the study was produced by a company that sales green tea like lipton.

I think too many times we read something that says "a study was conducted" and right away we believe it.
 

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Bambam, ofcourse you have to be critical about what you read. But the fact that Lipton sponsered a study does NOT mean the paper is garbage. If green tea would have adverse effects the paper probably wouldn't get published, but to say the findings of a paper are fake is a pretty big leap of faith. Furthermore, alot of nutritional research is sponsered, big studies are expensive and the money has to come from somewhere, if you think all that research is unreliable, we would still be in the middle ages. Unless you want to start paying 10 times as much taxes?

Futhermore, did you actually check the papers I posted for commercial intrests? Do you think Harvard is a sell out?
 
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