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EVerything you need to know about nutrition part one.

Powerlifter MB

Powerlifter MB

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I posted this on another site and think it might be useful here. All questions are welcome, enjoy.


I'd like to get the information out there for everyone, especially beginners. I see a lot these types of questions asked on other sites and I'm going to answer all the "noob" questions I've heard plus more here.

The Basics

Fats are divided into 3 categories. Triglycerides, sterols and phospholipids. The triglycerides are fat the are liquid are room temperature(unsaturated) and fats that are solid at room temperature(saturated). You need to consume mono, and polyunsaturated fats as well as saturated fats. Your body makes cholesterol(building block of testosterone) from fats. Depending on goals and bodyweight eat between 60-90 grams of fat a day. Avoid hydrogenated products(trans fat).

Carbohydrates are made up of 3 broad categories, Monosaccarrides, disaccharides and polysaccharides. Sugars that are commonly found in foods are the Monosaccharrides, glucose, and fructose (galactose is in here too but is rare). The disaccharides are two of the monosaccharrides, so for example when glucose bonds with glucose maltose(disaccharide) is formed. The disaccharides are, maltose, sucrose(table sugar), and lactose (milk sugar. And finally the most complex carbs and slowest digesting are the polysaccharides. These are composed of, glycogen(found only in animal sources), starches and fibers. Fiber is not digested by the human body and yields very little energy. Starches are found in plants and, like glycogen is the human's stored form of energy, starches are plant's stored energy. Glycogen is the stored form of energy in animals and is found rarely in foods. The carbohydrates are the fuel source of the body. If enough carbs aren't being ingested fat and protein can be turned to glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis. In short, eat carbs because protein and fat have other uses.

Protein is amino acids, three categories again. Essential amino acids, conditional essential aminos and nonessential aminos. Essential amino acids are phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, isoleucine, methionine, leucine, and lysine. These cannot be synthesized by the body and therefore must be eaten. Conditional essential aminos include glutamine and these become essential if you're a certain age, usually youth, and disease. Protein is important but is no more essential than fat and carbs for building muscle.

Q:How much protein do I need to eat daily?
A:1 gram per lbs of bodyweight. Anymore will be converted to glucose if you're in a carb shortage and if you're not then it's turned to fat.

Q:How much water do I drank a day?
A: At least a gallon, more is useful on a creatine cycle.

Q: If cholesterol is the building block of testosterone how much should I eat?
A: Cholesterol is HDL and LDL LDL being "bad" and HDL being "good". You body makes between 800-1300mgs a day, far more than you eat. So the answer is you don't need to eat any dietary cholesterol just get all your fats and you can make cholesterol just fine.

Anymore questions on nutrition I'd be happy to add to this.
 
tim290280

tim290280

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Thought I'd address this:
I posted this on another site and think it might be useful here. All questions are welcome, enjoy.


I'd like to get the information out there for everyone, especially beginners. I see a lot these types of questions asked on other sites and I'm going to answer all the "noob" questions I've heard plus more here.

The Basics

Fats are divided into 3 categories. Triglycerides, sterols and phospholipids. The triglycerides are fat the are liquid are room temperature(unsaturated) and fats that are solid at room temperature(saturated). You need to consume mono, and polyunsaturated fats as well as saturated fats. Your body makes cholesterol(building block of testosterone) from fats. Depending on goals and bodyweight eat between 60-90 grams of fat a day. Avoid hydrogenated products(trans fat).
Fats are much more complicated (speak to a chemistry major). In dietry terms we are dealing with fatty acids which are aliphatic monocarboxylic acids, derived from, or contained in esterified form in an animal or vegetable fat, oil or wax. Types of fats in food: Unsaturated fat; Monounsaturated fat; Polyunsaturated fat; Trans fat; Omega fatty acids, omega 3, omega 6, omega 9; Saturated fat; Interesterified fat.

The human body can produce all but two of the fatty acids it needs; linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. These are considered the essential fatty acids. Along with the most common omega 3, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, these are the most important fats to get in the diet.

Carbohydrates are made up of 3 broad categories, Monosaccarrides, disaccharides and polysaccharides. Sugars that are commonly found in foods are the Monosaccharrides, glucose, and fructose (galactose is in here too but is rare). The disaccharides are two of the monosaccharrides, so for example when glucose bonds with glucose maltose(disaccharide) is formed. The disaccharides are, maltose, sucrose(table sugar), and lactose (milk sugar. And finally the most complex carbs and slowest digesting are the polysaccharides. These are composed of, glycogen(found only in animal sources), starches and fibers. Fiber is not digested by the human body and yields very little energy. Starches are found in plants and, like glycogen is the human's stored form of energy, starches are plant's stored energy. Glycogen is the stored form of energy in animals and is found rarely in foods. The carbohydrates are the fuel source of the body. If enough carbs aren't being ingested fat and protein can be turned to glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis. In short, eat carbs because protein and fat have other uses.
Carbs are two categories with two subsets: simple, mono and disaccharides; complex, poly and oligosaccharides. Only some carbohydrates can actually be used as fuel by the human body. The others require specialised digestive tracts or bacteria to utilise them (e.g. cellulose). Etc......
Protein is amino acids, three categories again. Essential amino acids, conditional essential aminos and nonessential aminos. Essential amino acids are the BCAAs and cannot be synthesized by the body and therefore must be eaten. Conditional essential aminos include glutamine and these become essential if you're a certain age, usually youth, and disease. Protein is important but is no more essential than fat and carbs for building muscle.
Protein:
Essential aminos are actually - phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, isoleucine, methionine, leucine, and lysine.

Branched chain aminos are non-linear aliphatic side-chain aminos and are only three of the essential aminos - leucine, isoleucine and valine.

Conditionally essential are - arginine, cysteine, glycine, glutamine, histidine, proline, serine and tyrosine. These are only needed when the body can't correctly manufacture them from precursors.
Q:How much protein do I need to eat daily?
A:1 gram per lbs of bodyweight. Anymore will be converted to glucose if you're in a carb shortage and if you're not then it's turned to fat.
How much protein is actually far less than 1g/lb. It is actually around 1.2-1.6g/kg dependant on activity level. Refer to this post - https://musclemecca.com/threads/tipton-protein-nutrition-abstracts.203942/
Q:How much water do I drank a day?
A: At least a gallon, more is useful on a creatine cycle
How much water is dependant upon bodyweight, dietry intake of solutes that need to be excreted, and fluid intake through food. It is somewhere in the order of 1 millilitre per calorie consumed for minimum levels, the more you consume the more water you need. This is where they get the 2-4.5L per day figure from as the "normal" calorie intake is 2000-3000. Healthy kidneys can process somewhere in the order 15 litres per day before you start to get hypotrenemia.
Q: If cholesterol is the building block of testosterone how much should I eat?
A: Cholesterol is HDL and LDL LDL being "bad" and HDL being "good". You body makes between 800-1300mgs a day, far more than you eat. So the answer is you don't need to eat any dietary cholesterol just get all your fats and you can make cholesterol just fine.
Cholesterol you do actually need to consume in the diet. Yes it is manufactured by the body but it does need the precursors from cholesterol and fats, especially in hormone production.
 
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Powerlifter MB

Powerlifter MB

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Nice add Tim, good info, I should have included that stuff but I was trying to keep it simple.

Please note that the categories I broke these up into are not set in stone but how I remember them.

The average bodybuilder/weightlifter on a bulk needs between .8-1.00 grams of protein per lbs of BW.

Yes fiber is also a carbohydrate that the body gets very little or no energy out of. I was just saying the 1 gallon a day thing as an estimate and yeah some people need more or less although few need less.

To tell you the truth I'm reading about lipoproteins right now, that's just the section I'm at in my nutrition book and a quote from there is "the liver makes about 800 to 1500 mgs of cholesterol per day thus contributing much more to the body's total than does the diet." Cholesterol is made from fragments of protein, carbs and fat by the liver. If you eat cholesterol though a diet you'll be taking in LDL which is not particularly beneficial.

You're right about the essential aminos Ik'm not sure what I was thinking, I'll edit that.
 
The_KM

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Many hormones are proteins. The body can deaminate proteins if cholesterol levels subside. Dietary cholesterol is not necessary, but in most cases it comes as a byproduct of protein sources. I also don't believe carbohydrates should be separated into two categories. Most are hydrolyzed into glucose for absorption. Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides fit nicely together, though one is a long chain of glucose and the other is of mixed monosaccharides.
 
Powerlifter MB

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Great info as always Kev. Isn't it also true that the dietary cholesterol is always LDL? I know that soluble fiber does lower cholesterol though. Yes most are hydrolyzed but fiber and cellulose aren't and I think you could also break it into the categories of energy yielding carbohydrates and non energy yielding carbohydrates. I thought that'd be easier if not then you really don't need to categorize them.
 
tim290280

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Many hormones are proteins. The body can deaminate proteins if cholesterol levels subside. Dietary cholesterol is not necessary, but in most cases it comes as a byproduct of protein sources. I also don't believe carbohydrates should be separated into two categories. Most are hydrolyzed into glucose for absorption. Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides fit nicely together, though one is a long chain of glucose and the other is of mixed monosaccharides.
Dietry cholesterol, as far as I understood, was preferentially used for hormone production as its digestion forms a lot of the precursors of some of the molecules required. Since they are usually also consumed with saturated animal fats they are ideally situated to be prefentially processed into hormones (sterol based ones like test). Obviously of course this amount is not going to be huge, so daily amounts would be small and just an off-shoot of normal meat intake. So what I was driving at was that you shouldn't get worried about dietry cholesterol.

The Carbs and fats I didn't go into too much detail as they are a quagmire of biological chemistry. The categories I quoted were based upon their chemical structures and relative digestion. If you view them in terms of what sort of hydrolysis or their fit together you can miss the bigger picture in terms of what they provide and how easy (time) they are to process.
Mike said:
I know that soluble fiber does lower cholesterol though. Yes most are hydrolyzed but fiber and cellulose aren't and I think you could also break it into the categories of energy yielding carbohydrates and non energy yielding carbohydrates. I thought that'd be easier if not then you really don't need to categorize them.
Fibre is technically any carbohydrate that cannot be digested by the body. There are a huge number of them, with cellulose being the most prominant due to its large structural component in plants. I come at this from the opposite end of things being a plant and soil scientist, which is why I had to post. So it is why I don't like the way some dieticians carry on about food, shows they don't really have a solid grounding in bio-chem (not that I do either).

One thing I didn't mention about proteins was the sources. Essential aminos are important, but all animal sources are regarded as complete because they contain all of these essential aminos. They may not have ideal ratios of each essential amino but that's why you shouldn't eat too much of any one protein source. Now plant based proteins are missing differing essential aminos such that sources need to be combined with another compatible source. Not really a worry unless you are vegetarian or vegan.
 
The_KM

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You do not need dietary cholesterol to maintain homeostasis. If in a deficiency, other energy exerting nutrients can be converted to cholesterol. I'm not qualifying your thoughts on hydrolyzation of carbs, and their correlated digestive transits. Whether hydrolyzation must occur more frequently depending on the amylotic/carbohydrate chain, there really isn't much of difference in the actual digestion and absorption process. I think there is under minding of the body's ability to manage energy intake

To separate amino acids into three categories is much too broad to demonstrate the body's roles of making and transiting amino acids. If an amino acid is not present for a specific proteinal response, others can be deaminated to match the specific demand.

For future reference, linoleic acid is an omega 6 fatty acid. Linolenic is omega 3. Both are EFA's.

They may not have ideal ratios of each essential amino but that's why you shouldn't eat too much of any one protein source. Now plant based proteins are missing differing essential aminos such that sources need to be combined with another compatible source. Not really a worry unless you are vegetarian or vegan.

I agree. Certain vege's can be complemented with other sources of amino acids to for a complete protein.
 
Braaq

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Great info as always Kev. Isn't it also true that the dietary cholesterol is always LDL? I know that soluble fiber does lower cholesterol though. Yes most are hydrolyzed but fiber and cellulose aren't and I think you could also break it into the categories of energy yielding carbohydrates and non energy yielding carbohydrates. I thought that'd be easier if not then you really don't need to categorize them.

Actually the type of cholesterol (HDL or LDL) you have in your body is dictated from the dietary fat you take in. You don't just take in LDL if you consume cholesterol.
No need to go into how this works but to keep it simple:
Unsaturated - Increase HDL, Decreases LDL
Saturated - Increase HDL, Increase LDL
Trans - Decrease HDL, Increase LDL (which is why this has been one of the leading causes of heart disease)
Then you have your Omega's help lower triglycerides and Increase HDL.
 
Adam23

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Actually the type of cholesterol (HDL or LDL) you have in your body is dictated from the dietary fat you take in. You don't just take in LDL if you consume cholesterol.
No need to go into how this works but to keep it simple:
Unsaturated - Increase HDL, Decreases LDL
Saturated - Increase HDL, Increase LDL
Trans - Decrease HDL, Increase LDL (which is why this has been one of the leading causes of heart disease)
Then you have your Omega's help lower triglycerides and Increase HDL.
exactly :xyxthumbs:
 
Mildredtabitha

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I find the information very useful to me.thank you!
 

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sweerie_banana

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How do i bookmark this post? There's very relevant information here. I think I have been drinking too much water. I will try to abide to this guidelines with the meals I consume.
 
luri

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I am not in a position to question the information you have provided here because I am no expert in diet and nutrition. However, I don't agree with the daily consumption of water you mentioned. You say at least 1 gallon and more, 1 gallon is almost 4 liters. Unless you live in the desert and you are outdoors for 6 hours or more, you don't need that quantity of water.
 

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