• musclemecca bodybuilding forums does not sell or endorse any bodybuilding gear, products or supplements.
    Musclemecca has no affiliation with advertisers; they simply purchase advertising space here. If you have questions go to their site and ask them directly.
    Advertisers are responsible for the content in their forums.

CARDIO - before or after training???

afgan-ali

afgan-ali

Well-known member
Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
154
Points
16
like i said cardio before or after weight training? and why?
 
El Freako

El Freako

LIFT OR DIE
VIP
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
Messages
8,262
Points
38
After, I want all the energy I can have for the weight training.
 
afgan-ali

afgan-ali

Well-known member
Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
154
Points
16
yeee thats wut i was thinkin tooo lol but any other benifits??
 
El Freako

El Freako

LIFT OR DIE
VIP
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
Messages
8,262
Points
38
Plus if you weight train before cardio you burn off most of your muscle glycogen so technically your body will be required to use stored energy (fat) to fuel itself.

This isn't exact science and I'm sure one of the professors on this site will correct me.
 
youngmusclejock

youngmusclejock

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Sep 17, 2007
Messages
1,087
Points
36
Neither, but if you must do cardio after weights... I prefer to do it late at night or a few hours after weights. Just all depends on your time flexibility..
 
philosopher

philosopher

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Jul 12, 2006
Messages
3,044
Points
38
Its best to seperate your cardio from your weight training session but if you dont have the time to do it than do it after your weight training. Take some gatorate and a protein shake before you start with the cardio so you dont get in a too catabolic state.
 
youngmusclejock

youngmusclejock

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Sep 17, 2007
Messages
1,087
Points
36
Also to add to Philosopher's advice you could also just take some bcaa's in the liquid form before your cardio..
 
youngmusclejock

youngmusclejock

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Sep 17, 2007
Messages
1,087
Points
36
Also what are your goals?
 
SerbMarko

SerbMarko

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
3,412
Points
38
first thing in the morning on an empty stomach..
 
wrestling lyon

wrestling lyon

Well-known member
Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Messages
366
Points
16
after weight training is best out of those two options because u will then be burning fat and not using up muscle while doing cardio, which would defeat the purpose of weight training, (that is if you are trying to gain size)
also if you are trying to build muscle you want to prioritize that over your cardio, just in the same way you would for a lagging body part
i would also suggest not doing cardio after you train legs since this would put a lot of strain upon your legs and you would not be able to put out the same effort as you would on "fresh" legs, but it's all up to you on that depending on how your body responds for you
 
tim290280

tim290280

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
9,265
Points
38
After weight training if you want the majority of benefits to be muscle and strength gains.
Plus if you weight train before cardio you burn off most of your muscle glycogen so technically your body will be required to use stored energy (fat) to fuel itself.

This isn't exact science and I'm sure one of the professors on this site will correct me.
There aren't any professors here to my knowledge only PhD's and MSc's (I don't count undergrads or BSc's).
 
The_KM

The_KM

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
895
Points
18
first thing in the morning on an empty stomach..

I'm not a fan of this, as physiologically your body will metabolize proteins (gluconeogenesis) before running to fatty acids for energy. Think about it, from a bodybuilder/athlete's point of view your body is, if not depleted, close to glycogen depletion in the morning. Carbs are what fuel any form of intense exercise.

The body can store up to 4-500g of carbs in the body as glycogen. Just in my opinion, I'd rather have that accumulated throughout the day. Holding onto muscle while cutting is tricky as it is.

Lastly,

Answering the question; cardio post workout is most effective or on non-training days or in the evening. When after the workout isn't CRUCIALLY important. What's more important is the form of cardio your doing to be put in a higher EPOC.

Hope this helps some. :1:
 
Braaq

Braaq

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
6,690
Points
38
After, to put it rather simply. Weightlifting is an anerobic exercise meaning you rely on your quick energy sources such as Creatine Phosphate and Glucose or Muscle Glycogen. If you do cardio you will expend most of your stores of muscle glycogen and will be less efficient in the weight room. Also, after you expend your muscle glycogen and creatine phosphate stores your body will more readily turn to its Aerobic cycle and turn to fat oxidation during your cardio after training.
The point of weight lifting (unless your dieting) is to stimulate hypertrophy, you cannot do this if you exhaust your immediate or quick energy sources on cardio.
 
The_KM

The_KM

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
895
Points
18
After, to put it rather simply. Weightlifting is an anerobic exercise meaning you rely on your quick energy sources such as Creatine Phosphate and Glucose or Muscle Glycogen. If you do cardio you will expend most of your stores of muscle glycogen and will be less efficient in the weight room. Also, after you expend your muscle glycogen and creatine phosphate stores your body will more readily turn to its Aerobic cycle and turn to fat oxidation during your cardio after training.
The point of weight lifting (unless your dieting) is to stimulate hypertrophy, you cannot do this if you exhaust your immediate or quick energy sources on cardio.

Nice post man.

However, some things I'm confused about that I am NOT arguing just looking over I guess.

First off: there are 3 energy systems the body uses. The phosphagen system, anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic glycolysis. When you weight train or do any other form of intense exercise, the phosphagen system is what's used first (creatine phosphate) because it's quickly enabled yet quickly depleted. However, it recovers. ATP is returned after 40-90 seconds and is ready to be used again. For instance, a sprint. Fast burst of energy, a peak then you slow down.

Glycolysis is the breakdown of glucose. During a time phrase that you run out of ATP the body turns, of course to the stored glucose. Anaerobic, being that lifting is anaerobic in nature, used anaerobic glyc second. Following that aerobic glyc. Each "step down" takes longer and longer to recover and replenish.

So my point that I'm confused about:

What you deplete during pre workout cardio is glycogen. When glycogen is depleted or low, the body will break down primarily proteins (AA's) into glucose, then pyruvate, the Acetyl CoA, etc to provide energy. THEN glycerol.

Am I making sense? Maybe I have it a bit wrong? Could def. be. After an interval cardio session, fax oxidization will happen to fit the replenishment of glycogen post workout.

Thought anyone?
Thanks.
 
afgan-ali

afgan-ali

Well-known member
Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
154
Points
16
ye thanks for all the advice but its really a time thing, no other time to do it. i just planning to do light cardio after weight training to start slowly getting it too summer phase without rushing into it too much, plus i just started weight training after along period of so am not dont wana lose any more muscle than i have during this period so probably light cardio after weights is less disadvantagous out of the two??
 
Braaq

Braaq

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
6,690
Points
38
Nice post man.

However, some things I'm confused about that I am NOT arguing just looking over I guess.

First off: there are 3 energy systems the body uses. The phosphagen system, anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic glycolysis. When you weight train or do any other form of intense exercise, the phosphagen system is what's used first (creatine phosphate) because it's quickly enabled yet quickly depleted. However, it recovers. ATP is returned after 40-90 seconds and is ready to be used again. For instance, a sprint. Fast burst of energy, a peak then you slow down.

Glycolysis is the breakdown of glucose. During a time phrase that you run out of ATP the body turns, of course to the stored glucose. Anaerobic, being that lifting is anaerobic in nature, used anaerobic glyc second. Following that aerobic glyc. Each "step down" takes longer and longer to recover and replenish.

So my point that I'm confused about:

What you deplete during pre workout cardio is glycogen. When glycogen is depleted or low, the body will break down primarily proteins (AA's) into glucose, then pyruvate, the Acetyl CoA, etc to provide energy. THEN glycerol.

Am I making sense? Maybe I have it a bit wrong? Could def. be. After an interval cardio session, fax oxidization will happen to fit the replenishment of glycogen post workout.

Thought anyone?
Thanks.

The_KM please don't be a mental masterbator :no:

Ok I just woke up from a nap but here it goes, but if I forget anything forgive me IS and tim can feel free to add on:

The Phosphocreatine system only lasts a matter of seconds, so the ATP used during most of your sets is from Glycolysis. As for your recovery of your Phosphocreatine system, that is generally due to the amount of creatine kinase available but again is exhausted in a matter of seconds.

Resistance exercise is an activity performed by individuals interested in competition, those who wish to improve muscle mass and strength for other sports, and for individuals interested in improving their strength and physical appearance. In this review we present information suggesting that phosphocreatine depletion, intramuscular acidosis and carbohydrate depletion are all potential causes of the fatigue during resistance exercise. In addition, recommendations are provided for nutritional interventions, which might delay muscle fatigue during this type of activity.

Lambert CP, Flynn MG. Sports Med. 2002;32(8):511-22.

First off it is called Aerobic Oxidation/Respiration not aerobic glycolysis ;) (never heard that before, but you never know it may be as well) which occurs in the mitochondria and uses oxygen.Glycolysis breaks 1 glucose into 2 pyruvate, producing 6 ATP. Pyruvate is used to make acetyl-CoA, the starting product for the citric acid cycle. Each turn of the cycle oxidizes 1 pyruvate, so it takes 2 turns to completely oxidize 1 glucose. Two turns produce 8 NADH, 2 FADH2, and 2 ATP. NADH and FADH2 are then oxidatively phosphorylated, resulting in 28 more ATP. The 3 stages together produce 30 to 38 ATP. This takes much longer and can take up to minutes to truly tap into this energy source which is generally from low to intermediate intensity exercise bouts or cardio.
I don't know where you got the glycerol part, glycerol is the backbone of triglycerides.

Gluconeogenesis may be what your thinking about which generation of glucose from non-carbohydrate carbon substrates such as pyruvate, lactate, glycerol, and glucogenic amino acids performed mostly in the liver. Although glycerol is sometimes not considered a true gluconeogenic substrate, as it cannot be used to generate new glucose.
This takes time and depending on your bodies energy requirements due to intensity and the duration of exercise will not be a sufficient way of delivering ATP because it consumes ATP to conduct gluconeogenisis. If you consume your muscle glycogen before you weight train you will not efficiently "regain" your muscle glycogen as you stated above to have as an effective workout. However, after resistance exercise when your muscle glycogen is low or depeleted (which is unlikely) and you perform low to intermmediate levels of cardio intensity your body will resort to Aerobic Oxidation because of it clearly garners more ATP.

I hope this answers your question, although I am not sure exactly what you were confused on. You reminded me of this kid in class that would raise his hand, explain out the steps to ask a question just in a way to be told that he was "right".. that is a mental masterbator.. don't be that guy :carduindisguise
 
Duality

Duality

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
3,502
Points
38
lol @ mental masturbator
 
The_KM

The_KM

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
895
Points
18
Thanks for the reply Braaq. There's a lot I don't understand right now, but I bookmarked this thread to review and learn. I didn't mean to be a mental masturbator, I just wasn't sure if I made sense or if I was right. I'm young and am for sure stll learning. Nothing meant by it. I've always heard it as aerobic glycolysis at my board so I guess that's why I referred to it as that here.
 
Braaq

Braaq

Mecca V.I.P.
VIP
Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
6,690
Points
38
Thanks for the reply Braaq. There's a lot I don't understand right now, but I bookmarked this thread to review and learn. I didn't mean to be a mental masturbator, I just wasn't sure if I made sense or if I was right. I'm young and am for sure stll learning. Nothing meant by it. I've always heard it as aerobic glycolysis at my board so I guess that's why I referred to it as that here.

I was just messing with you about that bro, we fuck around a lot on here with each other. So don't take offense to it, you will know when you it an intentional insult or jab but usually I won't do that unless it really is dragged to that low of a level. So sorry if you took it to heart.
As for the Aerobic Glycolysis, it may be called that... just in my schooling and journals I have read I have never heard of it referred to as that before. But it doesn't mean that it isn't referred to as that either. It makes sense though.
 

Similar threads

xtacy
Replies
10
Views
5K
tim290280
tim290280
HATER
Replies
4
Views
3K
Aanna
A
COACH
Replies
0
Views
2K
COACH
COACH
Top