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Healthy adult males should have from one to nine nanograms per mL of GH in their blood.

How to design a routine, the easy way.

Fatality

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Finding the right weight lifting routine can be difficult and complicated. There are many types of routines; each with it’s own advantages and disadvantages. What works for one person may not work for another and different people may have different goals. The following is a generalized guide to designing workouts. It is not intended to be an end all guide to working out with weights. There are many different methods of weight lifting; too many to mention in such a short article.
I highly recommend Bodybuilding.com’s workout database. It gives a much wider variety of ideas on how to workout than are presented here. Once again, these are just some generalized ideas on how to workout.
I won’t be covering warm up methods. I’m also not going to give my opinion on the use of different rep speeds in this article. Just so you know, I use a rep speed of 1-2 seconds concentric, a 0-1 sec pause in between, and 1-3 second’s eccentric phase of exercise movement. I perform all work sets to positive failure. Also, remember that no work out routine will work very well when combined with poor diet and nutrition.


Step One: Choose a rep scheme that works for your goals.

3-6 reps (Strength), 6-8 (Mass and Strength), 8-12 (Mass and Endurance), 12-15 (Endurance)

Step Two: Choose the amount of time you’ll be resting between sets

a. 30 seconds (not really long enough for muscle to recover) (good for getting pumped feeling)
b. 1 minute (moderately good recovery)(works well for many)
c. 2 minutes (almost complete recovery of ATP levels)
d. 3 minutes or longer (100% ATP recovery in muscles)(works well for power lifters)

Step Three: Choose the number of days a week you want to workout. (I recommend working out 3 days or more a week)

Step Four: Choose the training frequency and number of sets for each body part.

a. 3-4 days a week full body workouts. (Works well especially well for beginners) 1-3 sets per body part.
b. (4-6 days a week) twice a week split. (Works well for many) 5-9 sets per body part.
c. Once a week 3-5 days a week. (Works well for hard gainers and those who require extra recovery time) 5-12 sets per body part.

Step Five: Choose what body parts to work on different days of the week. (Those interested in full body workouts can skip this section)

a. (A classic idea) Do pushing exercises one day, pulling exercises another day, and legs/calves another day. Example: Monday: Back/Biceps/Forearms, Tuesday: Chest/ Shoulders/ Triceps/ Traps, Wednesday: Legs/Calves/Abs.
b. Many other combinations will work well. Combinations of (not necessarily in this order) Chest, Back, Biceps, Triceps, Legs, Calves, Traps, Shoulders, and if you want to forearms and Abs.

Step Five: Choose what specific exercises you’ll be doing.

a. List of some of the Foundation Exercises.
Chest: Bench Press, Incline Bench Press, Decline Bench Press, Flat Dumbbell Press, Incline Dumbbell Press, Decline Dumbbell Press, Parallel bar Dips.

Back: Dead Lifts, Bent over rowing (Dumbbell or Barbell), Pull Ups (weighted or no weights), Lat Pull Downs (can be done with varied grips and types of bars), Bent over cable rowing, T-Bar rowing

Legs: Barbell Squats, Straight Leg Dead lifts, Barbell or Dumbbell Lunges, Leg Press.

Calves: Standing Calf Raise, Donkey Calf Raise, Seated Calf Raise, and Calf Raises (using Leg Press)

Shoulders: Overhead Press (Standing or Sitting)(Dumbbell or Barbell), Upright Rowing, Side Dumbbell Lateral Raises, Bent Over Lateral Raises (Dumbbell or Barbell)

Biceps: Standing (Dumbbell or Barbell) Curls, Standing EZ-Bar Curls.

Triceps: Close Grip Bench Press, Lying Triceps Extensions (Dumbbell or Barbell)(a.k.a. Skull Crunchers), Overhead Dumbbell Extension, Cable Press Downs (can be done with a rope or different types of bars)

Abs: Cable Crunches, Bicycle Crunches, Lying Crunches, Incline Crunches, Stability Ball Crunches, Hanging Leg Raises, Stability Ball Leg Raises.

b. Many Other Exercises Not Listed (good to add variety and as additions to workout)

Step Six: Decide in what order to do the exercises on specific days. In general multi-joint exercises should be performed first. I personally don’t perform shoulder exercises immediately after chest exercises, as I can’t lift as much weight for shoulders if they’re already tired from doing chest exercises. Other than that it’s up to you.


Putting It All Together: I personally feel that multi-joint compound movement exercises should be the foundation of a good weight lifting program (for healthy individuals who do not have major postural abnormalities, limited range of motion, or who are undergoing rehabilitation). Remember that it’s good to change your workout variables periodically.(Every four to six weeks) This keeps your workouts fresh and stimulates your muscles in a new way.


I hope this article was helpful in providing some ideas for a weight lifting routine. Good luck in all your training endeavors!
 

TJ

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As far as the rep ranges and rest periods go, any routine should include all of them at some point.
 

PrinceVegeta

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nice post there.....and what wolf said is right....it all helps with the mixing up of trainings...sometimes u dont have to completely change a routine for shock....changing reps is sometimes enough to get the body responding again
 

MetalMX

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Today i tried doing the fullbody routine instead of my usual split routine and man i tell you it burnt me out even from the first day!

Leg Press - 3 sets 10 reps
Deadlifts - 2 sets 8 to 10 reps
Chin-ups - 3 sets 8 to 10 reps
Incline Bench - 4 sets 8 to 10 reps
Dumbbell Press - 3 sets 10 reps
Side Lateral 1 set 10 reps
Dips - 3 sets 10 reps
Cable Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps

Whoa! Try it and you'll be dead after.
 

knight_rider

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i have a big problem with this line

''3-6 reps (Strength), 6-8 (Mass and Strength), 8-12 (Mass and Endurance), 12-15 (Endurance)''

its basically made up, rep range doesnt effect mass in the ways these terms suggest, just because you did 8 reps doesnt mean you will increase size, and because you did 3 you will improve strength!

these classifications are bogus, what will increase size is either progressing in strength over a rep range, or increasing reps on a specific weight!

if you keep using more and more weight for 6 reps over time your increasing your size as long as your nutrition is adequate, and if you increase weights on the 12-15 reps, size will also follow!

rep ranges should be based on efficiency vs. safety, basically you want a moderate rep range usually 6-10, (but can vary on different bodyparts/ exercises) that allows you to perform the exercise relatively safe and allows you to use correct form to stimulate the target muscle and progression!

id hardly call 15 reps endurance, i wouldnt even call it muscular endurance

if your rep range is say 3 reps for the becnh press, than progressing to 4 reps next session would be hard considering the percentage increase, it would probably be unsafe too! of course you can increase the weight slowly over time and maintain the 3 rep range, which will increase hypertrophy etc.

when you choose a moderate rep range of say 6-10, its very easy to progress, from 6-7-8-9-10 over a few sessions. then you can up the weight and start at 6 again, in this rep range you can control the weight and use good form to stimulate the target muscle, and the percentage increases from 1 rep to the next, is not as difficult as the 3 rep range example earlier!

so yeah, i have no problem with the article, just the way the rep ranges are categorised to infer certain types of progression which totally miss interpret how growth occurs etc!
 

TJ

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i have a big problem with this line

''3-6 reps (Strength), 6-8 (Mass and Strength), 8-12 (Mass and Endurance), 12-15 (Endurance)''

its basically made up, rep range doesnt effect mass in the ways these terms suggest, just because you did 8 reps doesnt mean you will increase size, and because you did 3 you will improve strength!

these classifications are bogus, what will increase size is either progressing in strength over a rep range, or increasing reps on a specific weight!

if you keep using more and more weight for 6 reps over time your increasing your size as long as your nutrition is adequate, and if you increase weights on the 12-15 reps, size will also follow!

rep ranges should be based on efficiency vs. safety, basically you want a moderate rep range usually 6-10, (but can vary on different bodyparts/ exercises) that allows you to perform the exercise relatively safe and allows you to use correct form to stimulate the target muscle and progression!

id hardly call 15 reps endurance, i wouldnt even call it muscular endurance

if your rep range is say 3 reps for the becnh press, than progressing to 4 reps next session would be hard considering the percentage increase, it would probably be unsafe too! of course you can increase the weight slowly over time and maintain the 3 rep range, which will increase hypertrophy etc.

when you choose a moderate rep range of say 6-10, its very easy to progress, from 6-7-8-9-10 over a few sessions. then you can up the weight and start at 6 again, in this rep range you can control the weight and use good form to stimulate the target muscle, and the percentage increases from 1 rep to the next, is not as difficult as the 3 rep range example earlier!

so yeah, i have no problem with the article, just the way the rep ranges are categorised to infer certain types of progression which totally miss interpret how growth occurs etc!

It's far better to incorporate some sort of periodization in a program instead of just trying to beat reps each week with the same weight; this is a very easy way to overtrain the CNS. I really do not understand your argument about good form. Using good form means you are using a weight that you can handle; whether your doing a one rep max or a 20 rep set you should be controlling the weight.
 

knight_rider

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It's far better to incorporate some sort of periodization in a program instead of just trying to beat reps each week with the same weight; this is a very easy way to overtrain the CNS. I really do not understand your argument about good form. Using good form means you are using a weight that you can handle; whether your doing a one rep max or a 20 rep set you should be controlling the weight.


im just saying that lower reps increase the temptation to use incorrect form and cause injury!

is it better to use periodisation instead of beating reps? im describe working from 6-10, as in when you get to 10 up the weight so your back at 6 again! yes this sort of training does burn the CNS out, but thats where peiodisation of you recovery and training intensity can be used........i blast and cruise, so i go hard for 6 weeks, and then for a week or two i drop back, stopping short of failure etc!
 

reaver04

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I have a question about Pushing and Pulling. Sometimes when I am doing my Chest and Shoulders workout, once i am finished with my chest workout im too tired to do Shoulders or my joints start hurting. Any tips on what should i do?

Edit:forgot to mention that i workout 6 days a week and have Wednesday off. Here's my split

Monday - Chest, Shoulders
Tuesday - Legs, Back
Wednesday - Bi/tris
Thursday - Rest
Friday - Chest, shoulders
Saturday - Legs, back
Sunday - Bi, Tri's

Its only been a week since i've been using this, should i keep this or go back to a 5 day split?
 

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